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Products of the period of Soviet occupation, many of the signature buildings that sprung up in the latter part of the 20th c., particularly in the capital Vilnius, share the characteristics of the Brutalist style.
Products of the period of Soviet occupation, many of the signature buildings that sprung up in the latter part of the 20th c., particularly in the capital Vilnius, share the characteristics of the Brutalist style. Taking inspiration from the same fountainheads that informed Modernism (Le Corbusier, Walter Gropius, and others), these buildings innovated in their use of commercial building materials like concrete, and the contrasting and balancing of strong, sharp angles and undulating forms. Though some remain controversial because of their connections to the country’s uncomfortable past, it is indisputable that their innovative forms define the face of modern Vilnius. In fact, these buildings together comprise a checklist of some of the structures that define the skyline of the city. The TV Tower, National Opera and Ballet Theatre, Vilnius Palace of Concerts and Sports, the Contemporary Art Centre, Office Building of the Cooperative Union of Lithuania in Vilnius, and the Wedding Palace. Whilst outside of the city, notable examples include Kaunas Picture Gallery and Elektrėnai Ice Palace.

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