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It is one of the biggest attractions for foreign visitors looking to better understand the troubling period of Soviet occupation. Taking a walk through the park, you’ll come across all manner of statues, some towering, some broken, but all carrying the heavy echo of an epoch that is (thankfully) long gone.

With the re-institution of Lithuanian Independence in 1991, the country was cleansed of the many ideological monuments that had been erected to celebrate the Soviet status quo. Left to rot in dumps and municipal yards, this hidden cultural heritage was saved by Druskininkai businessman Viliumas Malinauskas who recognized their aesthetic worth. And with the dedication of 20 ha of parkland in Grūtas near his home town for their display, Grutas Park was born. These days, it is one of the biggest attractions for foreign visitors looking to better understand the troubling period of Soviet occupation. Taking a walk through the park, you’ll come across all manner of statues, some towering, some broken, but all carrying the heavy echo of an epoch that is (thankfully) long gone.

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